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News Release | Environment Texas

Haunted Protest: Students, activists ask UT to cut frightening pollution

AUSTIN – Halloween costumed students and activists gathered outside UT Chancellor McRaven's office today to ask him to insist oil companies which lease UT land cut the global warming pollution “haunting the planet.” Infectious diseased-zombies, wildfire-burned fire fighters, polar bears in snorkels and mask and others gathered to ask UT to help solve global warming, not make it worse.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Texas solar capacity grew 62% in 2015

AUSTIN – Texas installed 207 megawatts (MW) of solar electric capacity in 2015 - a 62% increase – and ranked 10th in the nation for cumulative solar installed, according to a new report released by Environment Texas and the Sierra Club. Electric grid operator ERCOT projects Texas will add as much as 27,200 MW of solar in the next fifteen years, but the groups said anti-solar policies and efforts to prop up failing coal-fired power plants could jeopardize this growth.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Lighting the Way IV

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Tyson among top water polluters in Texas

HOUSTON – Tyson Foods, one of the world’s largest meat and poultry producers, generates the most animal manure of major companies surveyed nationwide, a new report said today. The Environment Texas Research & Policy Center study documented pollution from Tyson and four other major agriculture conglomerates, responsible for 44 percent of the pork, chicken, and beef produced in the U.S.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Corporate Agribusiness and the Fouling of America’s Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides. Today’s agribusiness practices – from the  concentration of thousands of animals and their waste in small feedlots to the massive planting of chemical-intensive crops such as corn – make water pollution from agribusiness both much more likely and much more dangerous.

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